Category Archives: Totally Inconsequential Thoughts

What Part of “School” Don’t You Understand?

I received an apologetic email from HackerSchool an hour ago, that was sorry to tell me they couldn’t admit me this fall – quizzically I was not gutted. HackerSchool is part of the wave of “Hacker Education,” where you exchange something with a company for programming education. HackerSchool differentiates in that you don’t pay them upfront, or necessarily at all – they just want a cut of a potential recruiting bonus when they pawn you to another company. They also have good perspectives on lightweight social rules and gender equality which piqued me.  Still, let us not mince, this is private education.… Read the rest

Morten’s Rule of Airports

This is Morten’s Rule of Airports, it’s history, and some of its benefits. The rule states:

If [the length of your layover] minus [the time it would take to comfortably get to the city centre and back] is greater than or equal to one hour, then you should exit the airport.

Or for those of you who read nerd:

morten_math

Origins

During an expedition to see my friend Morten in British Colombia, in which I was struggling with travel-stress, I was struck by a story of enlightened travelling genius. Morten told of a tale where a flight of his was delayed at Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris by several hours.… Read the rest

Sneak Peek at Wikimedia’s New Bold, High Concept Iconography

Wikimedia’s User Experience team invited me and a few others into the office to be part of focus group concerning a proposed new iconography.

20140528_005
The are two proposed new design languages, and an icon or “mark” for each Wikimedia project.
A selfie with two of the fablous design team, May and YuFei.
Penchant for selfies. Myself (left) with two of the fabulous design team, May (centre) and Yufei (right).

With free pizza proffed, the UX team Jared Zimmerman, May Galloway, and Yufei Liu, (pictured right) launched right into the need for these new set of icons, or “marks” as they are calling them.

  • The current logos don’t scale to 16 pixels square, and don’t overlay well.
Read the rest