Category Archives: Lesser Thoughts

WIGI, an Inspire Grantee

WIGI, the Wikipedia Gender Index, my project which looks at the gender representation in Wikipedia Biography articles, has won an Inspire Grant.

Over the last six months along with fellow Wikipedians we prototyped and extended this research into a paper Gender Gap Through Time and Space: A Journey Through Wikipedia Biographies and the ‘WIGI’ Index”. One aspect of the biography gender gap we were not able to observe however was the trend of female and nonbinary biography.  We were only ever looking at a single point in time because it’s too computationally complex to compare all the histories of the Wikipedias together at once.… Read the rest

Asking Ever Bigger Questions With Wikidata

This is a Guest-Blog I wrote for Wikimedia Deutschland: copied here:

German summary: Maximilian Klein benutzt Wikidata als als Datenfundus für statistische Auswertungen über das Wissen der Welt. In seinem Artikel beschreibt er, wie er in Wikidata nach Antworten auf die großen Fragen sucht.

Asking Ever Bigger Questions with Wikidata

Guest post by Maximilian Klein

A New Era

Simultaneous discovery can sometimes be considered an indication for a paradigm shift in knowledge, and last month Magnus Manske and I seemed to have both had a very similar idea at the same time. Our ideas were to look at gender statistics in Wikidata and to slice them up by date of birth, citizenship, and langauge.… Read the rest

Which Index Is WIGI Most Closely Related To?

In my lastest paper “Gender Gap Through Time and Space: A Journey Through Wikipedia Biographies and the ‘WIGI’ Index” (blog post and on arxiv.org), my co-author Piotr Konieczny and I proposed a gender index. WIGI, the Wikipedia Gender Inequality Index, is composed of many indicators, but one in particular, the “nation-WIGI”, was designed to be comparable with other well-known indices. The nation-WIGI ranks each nation by the ratio of female biography articles who are  citizens of that nation.  Designed in this way it is possible to correlate WIGI to other indexes. And potentially, we thought, given enough indexes and with high enough correlations, we could get a sense for what WIGI is measuring in terms of other indices.… Read the rest

Cyberwizard Institute: Retrospective

 

Cyber Wizard Institute

The Cyberwizard Institute  (CWI) was a free programming school based out of Sudo Room, running for the month of January 2015. The proclamation that I saw on their website before I volunteered to teach there was:

cwiThe idea is to be an anti-bootcamp. Anyone can participate. It’s free. We’re going to try hard to have lecture notes, assignments, and lecture livestreams up online. It will be primarily self-directed, but with guidance from higher level wizards.

As a founding member of sudoroom since 2011, but suffering from a recent malaise in my hacktivism, this was the perfect project to reinvigorate my involvement.Read the rest

Genius.com’s Curatorial Lesson: Constraining Users Less Makes Them More Collaborative

I interviewed with Genius.com this past week through the fact that they are wanting to be more ‘Wiki’, and I am looking a way to fund my Wiki-based research. After a few videochats, it didn’t quite work out between us, as they are not set-up for housing pure research just yet. But there were some quizzical results that came out of the interview process around user-trust.

I did not want to take their standard programming test because under good advice you never should. Instead I suggested that as a work-trial I run and report the collaborativeness measures I developed this year (accepted to CSCW ’15) on their data.… Read the rest

Häskell und Grepl: Data Hacking Wikimedia Projects Exampled With The Open Access Signalling Project

In what could easily be a recurring annual trip,Matt Senate, and I came to Berlin this week to participate in Open Knowledge Festival. We spoke at the csv,conf a fringe event in its first year, ostensibly about the comma separated values, but more so about unusual data hacking. On behalf of WikiProject Open Access – Signalling OA-ness team, we generalized our experience in data-munging with Wikimedia projects for the new user. We were asked to make the talk more story-oriented than technical; and since we were in Germany, we decided to use that famous narrative of Häskell and Grepl.… Read the rest

Prerequisite-free Set Theory – Just The Intuition

Logicomix, page 162.
Logicomix, page 162.

My favourite Hackerspace Sudo Room  is very close to  Bay Area Public School,  whose concept of a anti-capitalist University intrigues me very much. In chatting  about their plans for Math education, they expounded on the need for a primer to Set Theory, as they had been learning the Philosophy of Alain Badiou, who utilizes those foundations. Their request was for softer, more intuitive introduction. And just a short 18 months after that casual chat, this last, Saturday June 14th 2014, I held that public education, and it went brilliantly. 2 very curious mind showed up and we had fun reading the comic example aloud.… Read the rest

Method of Reflections: Explained and Exampled in Python

The introduction of post is mirrored here, but the full tutorial is on IPython Notebook Viewer.

Method of Reflections Explained and Exampled in Python

 

See how the Method of Reflections evolves as a recursive process.
See how the Method of Reflections evolves as a recursive process.

The Method of Reflection (MOR) is a algorithm first coming out of macroeconomics, that ranks nodes in a bi-partite network. This notebook should hopefully help you implement the method of reflection in python. To be precise, it is the modified algorithm that is proposed by Caldarelli et al., which solves some problems with the original Hidalgo-Hausmann (HH) algorithm doi:10.1073/pnas.0900943106. The main problem with (HH) is that all values converge to a single fixed point after sufficiently many iterations.

Read the rest