Category Archives: Lesser Thoughts

Dear NSF: Part 1

In what will surely not be the last time I ask the U.S. government for money, I made the plea to be a fellow of theirs today. The Nation Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSFGRFP)  supports new PhD students in their research aims for 3 years.  And I am told, and also suppose, that I want that. The way in which they ask you to prostrate is a standard multi-essay plus recommendations mode. The essays, when viewed as “papers for which you haven’t done the work,” were useful writing and thought exercises. I am quite energized by firming up a proposal about what I might do in the next three years, even if it seems incomprehensibly difficult and moon-shot-ish  right now.… Read the rest

Am I Doing My PhD In The Open?

Yesterday I clicked on a JSTOR link, and a full text PDF popped up – it wasn’t an Aaron Schwarz liberation plan. I was in the academy reading closed access research. I’m in the academy, and I’m on the precipice of taking it for granted.

Last November I asked if I should do my PhD in the open and answered in the affirmative, but at that point I hadn’t even been accepted by any PhD-granting institutions. Only one month into ensconcing myself in the GroupLens lab, at the Univ. of Minnesota, I somehow forgot about the my commitment to openness.… Read the rest

OpenSym 2015 – Wikipedia in the World of Global Gender Inequality Indices

In a previous post I outlined how the process of correlating the gender bias from Wikipedia with other gender inequality indices. Tomorrow I will present a poster on the same topic at OpenSym 2015. I’ll be explicating how Wikipedia’s biographical bias is closer to the gender bias in highly-qualified jobs, than longevity. It’s part of what I’ve been discovering during my Grant with the Wikimedia Foundation. You can read more in the preprint and poster.

Preprint:

Wikipedia in the World of Global Gender Inequality Indices: What The Biography Gender Gap Is Measuring

Poster:

OpenSym 2015 Poster

Read the rest

WIGI, an Inspire Grantee

WIGI, the Wikipedia Gender Index, my project which looks at the gender representation in Wikipedia Biography articles, has won an Inspire Grant.

Over the last six months along with fellow Wikipedians we prototyped and extended this research into a paper Gender Gap Through Time and Space: A Journey Through Wikipedia Biographies and the ‘WIGI’ Index”. One aspect of the biography gender gap we were not able to observe however was the trend of female and nonbinary biography.  We were only ever looking at a single point in time because it’s too computationally complex to compare all the histories of the Wikipedias together at once.… Read the rest

Asking Ever Bigger Questions With Wikidata

This is a Guest-Blog I wrote for Wikimedia Deutschland: copied here:

German summary: Maximilian Klein benutzt Wikidata als als Datenfundus für statistische Auswertungen über das Wissen der Welt. In seinem Artikel beschreibt er, wie er in Wikidata nach Antworten auf die großen Fragen sucht.

Asking Ever Bigger Questions with Wikidata

Guest post by Maximilian Klein

A New Era

Simultaneous discovery can sometimes be considered an indication for a paradigm shift in knowledge, and last month Magnus Manske and I seemed to have both had a very similar idea at the same time. Our ideas were to look at gender statistics in Wikidata and to slice them up by date of birth, citizenship, and langauge.… Read the rest

Which Index Is WIGI Most Closely Related To?

In my lastest paper “Gender Gap Through Time and Space: A Journey Through Wikipedia Biographies and the ‘WIGI’ Index” (blog post and on arxiv.org), my co-author Piotr Konieczny and I proposed a gender index. WIGI, the Wikipedia Gender Inequality Index, is composed of many indicators, but one in particular, the “nation-WIGI”, was designed to be comparable with other well-known indices. The nation-WIGI ranks each nation by the ratio of female biography articles who are  citizens of that nation.  Designed in this way it is possible to correlate WIGI to other indexes. And potentially, we thought, given enough indexes and with high enough correlations, we could get a sense for what WIGI is measuring in terms of other indices.… Read the rest

Cyberwizard Institute: Retrospective

 

Cyber Wizard Institute

The Cyberwizard Institute  (CWI) was a free programming school based out of Sudo Room, running for the month of January 2015. The proclamation that I saw on their website before I volunteered to teach there was:

cwiThe idea is to be an anti-bootcamp. Anyone can participate. It’s free. We’re going to try hard to have lecture notes, assignments, and lecture livestreams up online. It will be primarily self-directed, but with guidance from higher level wizards.

As a founding member of sudoroom since 2011, but suffering from a recent malaise in my hacktivism, this was the perfect project to reinvigorate my involvement.Read the rest

Genius.com’s Curatorial Lesson: Constraining Users Less Makes Them More Collaborative

I interviewed with Genius.com this past week through the fact that they are wanting to be more ‘Wiki’, and I am looking a way to fund my Wiki-based research. After a few videochats, it didn’t quite work out between us, as they are not set-up for housing pure research just yet. But there were some quizzical results that came out of the interview process around user-trust.

I did not want to take their standard programming test because under good advice you never should. Instead I suggested that as a work-trial I run and report the collaborativeness measures I developed this year (accepted to CSCW ’15) on their data.… Read the rest