Category Archives: Lesser Thoughts

Genius.com’s Curatorial Lesson: Constraining Users Less Makes Them More Collaborative

I interviewed with Genius.com this past week through the fact that they are wanting to be more ‘Wiki’, and I am looking a way to fund my Wiki-based research. After a few videochats, it didn’t quite work out between us, as they are not set-up for housing pure research just yet. But there were some quizzical results that came out of the interview process around user-trust.

I did not want to take their standard programming test because under good advice you never should. Instead I suggested that as a work-trial I run and report the collaborativeness measures I developed this year (accepted to CSCW ’15) on their data.… Read the rest

Häskell und Grepl: Data Hacking Wikimedia Projects Exampled With The Open Access Signalling Project

In what could easily be a recurring annual trip,Matt Senate, and I came to Berlin this week to participate in Open Knowledge Festival. We spoke at the csv,conf a fringe event in its first year, ostensibly about the comma separated values, but more so about unusual data hacking. On behalf of WikiProject Open Access – Signalling OA-ness team, we generalized our experience in data-munging with Wikimedia projects for the new user. We were asked to make the talk more story-oriented than technical; and since we were in Germany, we decided to use that famous narrative of Häskell and Grepl.… Read the rest

Prerequisite-free Set Theory – Just The Intuition

Logicomix, page 162.
Logicomix, page 162.

My favourite Hackerspace Sudo Room  is very close to  Bay Area Public School,  whose concept of a anti-capitalist University intrigues me very much. In chatting  about their plans for Math education, they expounded on the need for a primer to Set Theory, as they had been learning the Philosophy of Alain Badiou, who utilizes those foundations. Their request was for softer, more intuitive introduction. And just a short 18 months after that casual chat, this last, Saturday June 14th 2014, I held that public education, and it went brilliantly. 2 very curious mind showed up and we had fun reading the comic example aloud.… Read the rest

Method of Reflections: Explained and Exampled in Python

The introduction of post is mirrored here, but the full tutorial is on IPython Notebook Viewer.

Method of Reflections Explained and Exampled in Python

 

See how the Method of Reflections evolves as a recursive process.
See how the Method of Reflections evolves as a recursive process.

The Method of Reflection (MOR) is a algorithm first coming out of macroeconomics, that ranks nodes in a bi-partite network. This notebook should hopefully help you implement the method of reflection in python. To be precise, it is the modified algorithm that is proposed by Caldarelli et al., which solves some problems with the original Hidalgo-Hausmann (HH) algorithm doi:10.1073/pnas.0900943106. The main problem with (HH) is that all values converge to a single fixed point after sufficiently many iterations.

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Profiles of Inspiring Wikimedians I Met at Wikiconference USA 2014

Wikiconference USA 2014, in New York, just finished, and more than usual this conference instilled in me a lot of motivating social energy. Yes, I did present there, twice, on “Answering Big Questions With Wikidata“, and “Signalling Open Access References,” but more so than usual I enjoyed attending other presentations. On reflecting why that was, I came to realize it was the earnest authentic effort of other Wikimedians, that shone so brightly. These are some of the more inspiring characters from the conference, but by no means a complete list.

Sumana Harihareswara

Sumana gave the opening keynote wherein she talked about implicit versus explicit exclusion.… Read the rest

The Virtuous Circle of Wikipeda: The Poster

It may seem like a small piece of work, but I wanted to commemorate this moment – my first poster. I never had the need to manufacture one. Today I presented it at NetSci (Network Science) 2014, and received many useful comments on the research. We found a few other that are, like ourselves, translating  the ‘method of reflections’ into new domains. The paper related to this poster is in review, but you can also access a preprint files on github.

On the art side I’d like to thank unluckylion, for encouraging me to make a bold statement. I think it paid off, and I’m only mildly guilty about the blatant copyvio of the Wikipedia logo.… Read the rest

Kleins search for Klajnbohms; an ancestral research trip to Zwoleń Poland

Third Generation
Third Generation
Fourth Generation
Fourth Generation
Fifth Generation
Fifth Generation

With my father, and his father, we went to find my Grandfather’s Grandfather (all on the paternal sides if your keeping up). The most we knew about this 5-generations ago man was a snippet from naturalisation papers –

“Solomon Klajnbaum, born 1880, from Zwolen, a Russian subject.”

On 30 of April 2014, having flown to Poland, we took the last leg to Zwoleń for Krakow, by way of hired private tour guide.

Note: very unfortunately our main camera was stolen later on in Poland, so here I stitch together what I can from camera phones, Google Street View screencaptures, and http://deathcamps.org/occupation/zwolen.html.… Read the rest

The Listiness of Wikipedia

View this report with the Ipython Notebook Viewer (where it looks best).

The Listiness of Wikipedia

Although it was only an aside, an answer of "What is a Reference work?" caught my attention at UC Berkeley iSchool's March 21st Friday Afternoon Seminar by Michael Buckland. One possible answer suggested was: works that are over 80% list.
marciabatesfig1
Bates' classification of References works search patterns.
That definition, although seeming a bit short, was actually serious suggestion published by Marcia Bates in 1984. [Bates, Marcia J. "What Is a Reference Book: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis." RQ 26 (Fall 1986): 37-57] This is an elegant solution in my opinion as a way to define reference works because although heuristic, it's entirely quantitative.
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The Topmost Cited DOIs on Wikipedia

You’re surfing a topic of great interest to you on Wikipedia, so interesting that you actually click through to the references. You’re excited to read the original material, but all of a sudden you are foiled—you’ve hit a paywall! And $35 to read an article is just too steep.

This image of Xanthichthys ringens is sourced from an open-access scholarly article licensed for re-use. How can we make that reusability explicit when citing this source in Wikipedia articles? For further details, see this Signpost op-ed by Daniel Mietchen.

The Wikipedia Open Access Signalling Project, which I’ve recently joined, sees this as a fantastic opportunity to spread the word about the Open Access (OA) movement.… Read the rest