Category Archives: Math

The Universal Empathy Machine: Nonviolent Communication Explained with Mathematics and Computer Science

0. The Universal Empathy Machine

Empathy is not sympathy. What’s the difference? Think of the Universal Turing Machine. It is a machine that accepts a program and data, and runs that program on that data. In this way it can simulate all programs on all data. Let us think of a human as a program and human experience as data. Sympathy then, is running your program on someone else’s data. Empathy is running their program on their data. As you can see the results of the sympathy and empathy computations are not guaranteed to be identical. In a nutshell Nonviolent Communication is about becoming the Universal Empathy Machine, to be able to emulate the architecture of an arbitrary person given an arbitrary experience.… Read the rest

Joining many DataFrames at once in Pandas: “n-ary Join”

Joining many DataFrames at once with Reduce

In my last project I wanted to compare many different Gender Inequality Indexes at once, including the one I had just come up with, called “WIGI”. The problem was that the rank and score data for each index was in a separate DataFrame. I need to perform repeated SQL-style joins. In this case I actually only had to join 5 dataframes, for 5 indices. But later, in helping my partner with her research, she came across the same problem needed to join more than 100. In my mind I saw that we wanted to accomplish this n-ary join.

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Prerequisite-free Set Theory – Just The Intuition

Logicomix, page 162.
Logicomix, page 162.

My favourite Hackerspace Sudo Room  is very close to  Bay Area Public School,  whose concept of a anti-capitalist University intrigues me very much. In chatting  about their plans for Math education, they expounded on the need for a primer to Set Theory, as they had been learning the Philosophy of Alain Badiou, who utilizes those foundations. Their request was for softer, more intuitive introduction. And just a short 18 months after that casual chat, this last, Saturday June 14th 2014, I held that public education, and it went brilliantly. 2 very curious mind showed up and we had fun reading the comic example aloud.… Read the rest

Wikipedia Edits Statistics by Category: Updated Presidential Edition

We’ve heard that Wikipedia might be able to predict the Vice President, but what about the honcho himself?  Using a combination of Python, R, and Wikipedia version histroy, I’ve delved inside the hivemind and emerged with some graphs that might have the answer. So without further ado, let’s try and predict the upcoming U.S. election.

2000

Wikipedia didn’t come to be until after the 2000 elections, so we can’t glean a lot of good data here. And although Bush has basically always outpaced Gore in editor interest, presidents seem to always get a lot more attention after they’re elected as you’ll see.… Read the rest

Circle Packing at Art Murmur

As part of sudoroom Art Murmur in August 2012, I decided to bring circle packing to the masses.

Here’s how I structured the game, and how you could build from it.

Equipment:

  • The game pieces consisted of 3 sizes of circles at 2.5cm 5cm and 8cm radii.
  • I was experimenting with the right point attribution for each. As shown the point values are 1, 3, and 8 respectively.
  • The maps were drawn by Anca Mosoiu of TechLiminal, and included the standard square, the African continent, and a silhouette of a meditating Buddha (pictured).

Rules:

  • Participants compete head-to-head,
  • and are given 30-seconds,
  • to lay down non-overlapping circles,
  • within the drawn boundary.
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Paradox?

Should you take someone else’s advice to trust yourself?

Proof

Case 1:

Suppose yes. Then you should take someone’s advice to trust yourself. So you should trust yourself. But if you trusted yourself you wouldn’t take someone else’s advice. Contradiction.

Case 2:

Suppose no. Then you should not take someone’s advice to trust yourself. So you should not trust yourself. If should not trust yourself then you ought to take other people’s advice. Contradiction.

 

Since both yes and no to this question lead to contradiction then the question presents a paradox. Q.E.D.

 … Read the rest